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2010 Fall Field Day

2010 Fall Field Day at Charles Towne Landing
 
This year's Fall Field Day event will be held October 9, 10-4, at Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site, in Charleston (more info and maps at http://www.charlestownelanding.travel and www.assc.net).

Any day is a good day to visit Charles Towne Landing, as it is, arguably, the flagship of the State Parks fleet. This is the site of the first permanent settlement of the Carolina Colony, and the park features an animal forest, hiking trails, a museum, and much more. This is a fun and family friendly event so please join us. There will be displays, demonstrations, lectures, artifact identification, and educational programs. A preliminary program follows.


ASSC Field Day 2010 Preliminary Program

Science of Archaeology

The Savannah River Site Archaeological Research Program - Chris Moore and Mark Brooks

Over the last two years, the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) has directed a volunteer-based research program investigating Carolina bays. The proposed research of Carolina bays involves utilizing dedicated avocational archaeologists and the interested public in an ongoing and systematic study of Carolina bay archaeology, geoarchaeology and geomorphology.  This long-term Carolina bay study by the SRARP addresses four basic research objectives. These are: 1) determining the age, origin, and evolution of Carolina bays; 2) delineating prehistoric cultural activities and site formation processes on Carolina bay sand rims; 3) determining the role of Carolina bays in prehistoric settlement systems; and 4) exploring linkages at Carolina bays between climate change, depositional processes, and prehistoric adaptations. This research is significant because it will address questions of bay origin, sand rim formation and chronology, and will provide evidence of buried surfaces associated with human occupation of bay rims.

This year the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) began a research project to 1) identify the locations of metavolcanic/metasedimentary quarries in the South Carolina Slate Belt, 2) characterize these sources geochemically using Neodymium isotope ratio analysis, and 3) characterize quarry samples mineralogically using thin-section petrographic analysis. The purpose of this study is to determine the geological provenance and chemical signature of stone quarries for sourcing prehistoric artifacts to stone sources throughout the Slate Belt.  This work will compliment the research conducted on stone quarries in the North Carolina Slate Belt by Steponaitis et al. (2006) (http://rla.unc.edu/Publications/pdf/ResRep25/) and will enhance our understanding of hunter-gatherer settlement systems and technological organization in the South Carolina Piedmont and beyond.  Moreover, this study has implications for modeling early hunter-gatherer stone procurement strategies and mobility over large distances and for refinement of existing settlement models (e.g. Anderson and Hanson1988; Daniel 1994, 1998).
Christopher Young - USC - Petrographic Analysis of Stone from the Great Pee Dee River
There are two models that try to explain Early Archaic mobility and settlement-subsistence patterns within the coastal plain of South Carolina. One states that people moved along river drainages taking advantage of resources along their path. The second model states that people in the Early Archaic period crossed river drainages and were tied to two stone quarries and this would have dictated their movement. This study looks at Early Archaic mobility by analyzing raw stone material from the Great Pee Dee River, debitage from the Kolb site as well as stone tools to try and determine if Early Archaic people were flexible enough to take advantage of local lithic material. By placing thin sections of these samples onto slides and examining them with a high powered microscope, petrographic analysis will demonstrate whether these lithic artifacts and river cobbles are from the same primary source or if they came from another extralocal source.

The Hunley Project -Johanna Rivera, Materials Science and artifacts. Display interpreting the conservation of the Hunley.

Charles Towne Landing -Cicek Beeby- A behind the scenes tour of the CTL Archaeology lab featuring artifact conservation, soil sample processing and more.

Primitive Technology

Blowguns - Visit with Doug Meyer of Kannapolis, North Carolina and listen to him tell you the history of the blowgun and demonstrate the effectiveness of the weapon, he may even let you have a shot at a paper rabbit!  

 
Stone Tool Hafting - Scott Jones of Elberton, Georgia is a primitive skills practitioner and professional archaeologist with nearly twenty years of experience in both fields. Visit Scott and watch him show you how to get a handle on a sharp rock (see: http://mediaprehistoria.com/about.html)
 
Cooking with Clay – Keith Grenoble of Floyd, Virginia will demonstrate prehistoric pottery manufacture, firing and use in cooking. Archaeological sites rarely produce whole vessels and the public interpretation of the site benefits greatly from seeing replicas of ancient pots and their use.
 
Sticks and Stones
. . . Sean Taylor, South Carolina Department of Natural Resources Archeologist will discuss and demonstrate the manufacture and use of hunting weapons such as the bow and arrow and Atlatl.

Exhibits

New South Associates - Recent Research in SC

 
College of Charleston Anthropology - Information on studying anthropology and archaeology, student and faculty research in SC and abroad will be presented. (Dr. Barbara Borg, Dee Dee Joyce, Maureen Hayes)

USC Anthropology - The anthropology department will provide information on opportunities to study anthropology and archaeology, along with presentations of student and faculty research in SC and the French Caribbean (Dr. Kenneth Kelly, Brooke Brilliant, James Nyman, Chris Judge).

Coastal Carolina / ASSC Waccamaw Chapter - recent research in Horry County and information on archaeology and anthropology at Coastal Carolina will be presented. (Dr. Cheryl Ward)

SC and Barbados - the Jewish Connection. Excavations at the Nidhe Israel Synagogue

Michael Stoner, University of the West Indies

Since the 1650s, the Jewish community on Barbados was instrumental in establishing Jewish communities throughout the Caribbean and North America to include Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim Synagogue in Charleston. Recent archaeological excavations by Michael Stoner at the Nidhe Israel Synagogue in Bridgetown, Barbados revealed a long forgotten Jewish ceremonial center and a pattern in the material remains that are analogous to the broader Barbados-Carolina Connection.

Charleston Museum

Theme: "The Value of the Dill Sanctuary, James Island, SC
 
Physical/Material Presentation: 1) Artifact Display cases, 2) "fold out" poster board-like display unit(s), and 3) brochures
 
1) 18th & 19th century artifacts (representative of Dill Sanctuary. hist. sites as well as several "rare"/fun artifacts - to catch interest)
2) presentation of explanatory maps, photos, among other graphics
3) brochures for The Charleston Museum, ASSC Charleston - Chapter, & C. of C./Charleston Museum Archaeological Field School slated for 2011

The Dill Sanctuary, located on James Island, has been protected by The Charleston Museum as a cultural and natural wildlife preserve for nearly a quarter century. Bordered by the Stono River on the West and New Town Cut on the north, the Dill Sanctuary encompasses about 580 acres and is the locus of intensive and extensive cultural and natural resources investigation(s) which contribute significantly to area education and research. Containing at least 16 archaeological sites reflecting prehistoric and historic occupations, the Dill Sanctuary is currently being nominated as a National Register District. Sites found on the sanctuary together represent continual occupation from the Early Archaic phase through modern times.

 
Historic integrity is impressive on Dill Sanctuary. For example primary roadways and cultivated field locations and shapes on the sanctuary are basically the same today as they were during the Colonial period. Two archaeological sites Stono Plantation and the Catherine Parker site, have yielded significant information and a fascinating array of material culture some of which will be exhibited at this year's Fall Field Day.

Martha Zierden and Ron Anthony

 
The Kolb Site
Diachronic Research Foundation, SC Department of Natural Resources, USC Lancaster-
 

Poster and artifact display. The Johannes Kolb Site (38DA75). The Kolb site is located near Darlington on the Great Pee Dee River. It has been occupied for at least 12,000 years and has produced hundreds of thousands of artifacts ranging from stone tools to the leavings of modern hunters and fishermen. Johannes Kolb was one of the first Europeans to settle the Pee Dee in the 1730s. During the 19th century a plantation slave settlement was on the site, and it served as a logging camp at the turn of the 20th century.

South Carolina Maritime Archaeology

The South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology’s Maritime Research Division- Ashley Deming, Carl Naylor

Description: The South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology’s Maritime Research Division is tasked with researching, recording, and protecting all of South Carolina’s submerged cultural resources.  South Carolina has a rich maritime history.  From Native American dugout canoes to Civil War blockade runners, South Carolina underwater archaeological sites can tell us invaluable information about events and people that changed the course of American history.  The Sport Diver Archaeology Management Program (SDAMP) is the public education and outreach arm of the Division.  Through presentations, workshops, field training courses, and much more, SDAMP is instilling an awareness and stewardship of South Carolina maritime heritage. The SDAMP exhibit will feature dive gear demonstrations and underwater writing
Colonial Dorchester- Recent Archaeology at Dorchester- Rebekah Sease

Come see what new discoveries are being made by archaeologists at Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site. Visit with the on-site Archaeologist and check out the technology being used to create the display of maps and associated artifacts that are helping archaeologist piece together the untold stories of daily life in this 18 century frontier village and trading town.

SC Department of Archives and History - Dr. Jodi Barnes and Rebekah Dobrasko

Archaeology & Archives: What Can You Dig Up at the State Archives?  

 
Archives hold important data used by archaeologists, such as maps, census records, and photographs.  Stop by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History booth to find out what types of resources might be useful for your historic or family research. 
The Walled City Project- Historic Charleston Foundation and partners. - Katherine Saunders.
 
Education 

Charles Towne Landing- Ongoing excavations at CTL will be interpreted by PRT archaeologist David Jones

Pottery Re-Fit

Come decorate a pot in your own style or chose a style used by people of the past. Afterwards, find out what archaeologists can learn from pottery. Then, try your hand at being an archaeologist and piece together the puzzle!

Pottery Re-Fit Schedule:

Session 1: 10am – 10:45am

Session 2: 11am – 11:45am

Session 3: 12pm – 12:45pm

Session 4: 1pm – 1:45pm

Session 5: 2pm – 2:45pm

Session 6: 3pm – 3:45pm

Archaeology Dig Boxes

Try out digging an archaeological unit with our dig boxes. Discover all the artifacts, map out your finds, and try your hand at interpreting an archaeology unit!

Scavenger Hunt

The hunt is on! Find all the clues hidden around Charles Towne Landing in our archaeology scavenger hunt. Those who succeed will be rewarded!

Coordinated by SCAPOD - Meg Gaillard, Helena Ferguson, Erika Shofner

Artifact Identification

USC- Lancaster, Chris Judge, coordinator
Charleston Museum Education Department

Examine archaeologists’ tools and local artifacts with the Charleston Museum Education Department. Families can try to identify artifacts using our artifact display as well as create necklaces from projectile points and other fun activities.

Stephanie Thomas

Lectures

Morning session:

10:00-10:10 – Welcome and grab a seat

10:10-10:25 – Andrew Agha (Brockington and Associates)

Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper at St. Giles Kussoe House

10:25-10:40 – Dr. Ken Kelly (University of South Carolina)

Archaeology of plantation life in the French Caribbean

10:40-10:55 – Martha Zierden (The Charleston Museum and Walled City Task Force)

The Walled City of Charleston: Archaeology at the Redan at Tradd Street

10:55-11:10 – James Nyman (University of South Carolina)

More Than Just Your 'Neighbor': Coastal Indians During European Expansion

11:10-11:25 – Rebekah Dobrasko (SC Archives and History)

Searching for South Carolina's 'Separate but Equal' Schools

11:25-11:40 – Stacey Young (New South Associates)

Archaeological Investigations at Hampton Plantation State Historic Site

Afternoon Session:

12:45-1:00 – Martha Zierden (The Charleston Museum and Walled City Task Force)

The Walled City of Charleston: Archaeology at the Redan at Tradd Street

1:00-1:15 – Rebekah Dobrasko (SC Archives and History)

Searching for South Carolina's 'Separate but Equal' Schools

1:15-1:30 – Dr. Ken Kelly (University of South Carolina)

Archaeology of plantation life in the French Caribbean

1:30-1:45 – Audrey Dawson (University of South Carolina)

Isolating the Middle Archaic: Recent excavations on Fort Jackson, SC

1:45-2:00 – Carl Steen and Jodi Barnes (Diachronic Research and SC Archives and History)

The Archaeology of Gullah People

2:00-2:15 – Stacey Young (New South Associates)

Archaeological Investigations at Hampton Plantation State Historic Site

Late Afternoon Session:

2:45-3:00 – Chris Judge (University of South Carolina)

Foragers, Feasts, and Features: Late Woodland Archaeology at the Kolb site.

3:00-3:15 – Audrey Dawson (University of South Carolina)

Isolating the Middle Archaic: Recent excavations on Fort Jackson, SC

3:15-3:30 – Carl Steen and Jodi Barnes (Diachronic Research and SC Archives and History)

The Archaeology of Gullah People

3:30-3:45 – Andrew Agha (Brockington and Associates)

Lord Anthony Ashley Cooper at St. Giles Kussoe House

3:45-4:00 – Brooke Brilliant (University of South Carolina)

Exploring Interactions: An examination of Colonoware and Historic Native American ceramics from Drayton Hall and the Lord Ashley Settlement.

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